Look Who’s Fair And Balanced (CJR.org)

(Aug. 22, 2006) The summer of 2006 marked an important milestone for Arab media. Israel and Hezbollah were locked in a bitter conflict that would claim the lives of more than 150 Israelis and an estimated 1,000 Lebanese — a third of them children. Each day brought brutal new images of civilian casualties. On American […]

Open Season on Journalists in the Middle East (CJR.org)

The pen may be “mightier than the sword,” but in recent years, the sword has left a trail of spilled ink – and blood. It is time for an international law banning targeted attacks on the media. (Aug. 1, 2006) After the carnage of this past weekend in the Middle East, two previous incidents seemed […]

Al-Jazeera International, Not Quite Ready for Takeoff (CJR.org)

CAIRO (April 27, 2006) – Those new monitors they’re installing in Washington briefing rooms will remain dark for a little while longer: Al-Jazeera International (AJI), the English-language cousin to the Bush administration’s Qatar-based nemesis, has once more delayed its launch plans. The channel was originally expected to go live early this year. Then late winter. […]

Western, Arab Journalists Miles Apart in Cartoon Rift (CJR.org)

DOHA, QATAR (Feb. 3, 2006) – It is a row that gives new meaning to the phrase, “publish and be damned.” The convulsion of outrage across the Muslim world over the publication of editorial cartoons deemed blasphemous to the Prophet Muhammad is another reminder of the essential disconnect in perceptions that continues to drive the rift […]

Reporting a revolution: the changing Arab media landscape (Arab Media & Society)

Vol. 1 2006 Camera-phone videos of Egyptian police torturing suspects posted on YouTube.com. Prostitution and masturbation discussed on satellite TV. The Iranian president reaching out to Arabs on his own blog. The times, as Bob Dylan sang in another context, are a’ changin’. Across the Middle East, new television stations, radio stations and websites are […]

A New Arab Media Rises From the Rubble (CJR.org)

CAIRO (Dec. 14, 2005) — In the explosion that killed An Nahar publisher Gebran Tueni in Beirut Monday could be heard the echoes of a new battle being waged in the Middle East. It is a conflict that pits the old guard of Arab politics against the young Turks of the Arab media. Tueni’s assassination is […]

Urban Renewal in the Global Village: How Palestine became a Marker of Muslim Identity (Journal of Transnational Broadcasting Studies)

(Fall 2005) Abstract A radical restructuring of the global media landscape and the emergence of information ghettos, in which US and Muslim audiences view policy through conflicting prisms, has transformed Palestine into a marker of Muslim identity among non-Arab Muslims. This development results, in part, from a failure of the Bush administration during its first […]

Beyond Media ‘Dialogues’: Time to put away the champagne flutes (Arab Media & Society)

Issue 3, Fall 2007 “It’s the condescending attitude that I get tired of,” a top editor at one of the leading Arab satellite news channels recently told me. “I know they mean well; but it’s the whole tone.” We were on our way to the airport after the latest in the seemingly endless parade of […]

Arab Media in the Vortex (Journal of Transnational Broadcasting Studies)

(Winter 2005) “Anyone who tells you they are not scared silly is lying,” retired Annahar publisher Ghassan Tueni, the living symbol of Lebanese media independence, said in mid-autumn as we sat in his office overlooking Beirut’s port and newly reborn downtown. “We built this glass tower as a symbol of the new Lebanon. Now it […]