Inside the Indonesian Newsroom: The Good, the Bad and the Hopeful (CJR.Org)

(May 3, 2013) — Indonesia remains a nation in flux. So, too, its journalism. Fifteen years after the country’s long-time strongman and president, Suharto, was overthrown and press restrictions were eased, Indonesian journalists continue to face a host of pressures: The pay is still lousy, the challenges still complex, the physical dangers still real. But […]

Indonesia can teach Egypt about post-revolution generals and politics (The Seattle Times)

JAKARTA (March 24, 2012) — “We warned them about trusting the military.” The topic of the conversation was Egypt, but the speaker was no anti-Supreme Council of the Armed Forces activist or Western human-rights worker. She was a top adviser to the vice president of Indonesia, a country that knows a thing or two about […]

Report on Media and Policy in the Muslim World Retreat

(Feb. 10, 2012) Journalists across the Muslim world are in need of political and practical support in the face of a backlash from governments struggling to undermine the media revolution sweeping the Middle East, Southeast and South Asia, according to a new report released by The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State […]

The Mission of Indonesian Journalism: Balancing Democracy, Development, and Islamic Values (Int’l Journal of Press/Politics)

Vol. 16 No. 2 April 2011 — Indonesia, the world’s third largest democracy, has been called a template for Muslim political reform and has the potential to serve as a bridge between the United States and the Islamic world. Indonesian journalists play a vital role. Since the  collapse of the Suharto regime in the late […]

Indonesian Journalism: Lessons for the U.S.? (CJR.org)

Published on CJR.org Feb. 4, 2011 American journalism is, as they say, “in transition.” But while the import of traditional values such as accuracy, balance, and professionalism are under question in the U.S., they remain the gold standard in places throwing off the yoke of autocratic rule and media control. That is reinforced in a […]

Lessons worth learning: The Indonesian model (Arab Media & Society)

Issue 6, Fall 2008 What a difference a few thousand miles makes. I spent the summer in Indonesia, a vast and complex nation that is home to more Muslims than all Arab countries put together. When I lived there in the 1990s, covering the final years of the Suharto era, there were many parallels to […]

Urban Renewal in the Global Village: How Palestine became a Marker of Muslim Identity (Journal of Transnational Broadcasting Studies)

(Fall 2005) Abstract A radical restructuring of the global media landscape and the emergence of information ghettos, in which US and Muslim audiences view policy through conflicting prisms, has transformed Palestine into a marker of Muslim identity among non-Arab Muslims. This development results, in part, from a failure of the Bush administration during its first […]

Political Islam’s Democratic Face (CommonDreams.org)

Published on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 by CommonDreams.org Even as militant Islamists from Spain to Pakistan command headlines, the White House once more inflames Muslim opinion, and the Bush administration continues its effort to reinvent the Middle East in America�s image, proponents of moderate political Islam are quietly but effectively developing the template for democratic […]

The Release Valve of Muslim Democracy: Southeast Asia’s Emerging Model (Global Dialogue Journal)

GLOBAL DIALOGUE Volume 6 ● Number 1–2 ● Winter/Spring 2004—Islam and Democracy Even as militant Islamists from Europe to the Philippines command headlines and the Bush administration feeds extremist sentiment with its effort to reinvent the “Greater Middle East” in America’s image, proponents of South-East Asia’s pragmatic blend of religion and politics are quietly but […]

Beyond Insensitivity: Bush Sends Mixed Signals to Indonesian Muslims (CommonDreams.org)

Published on Friday, October 17, 2003 by CommonDreams.org In the corridors of power in Washington and on the campuses of American universities these days, the great topic of debate is: How can the U.S. government better communicate with Muslims around the world? The simply answer is, it cannot. Not as long as U.S. policy is […]