POWs, Dead Dictators, and Journalistic Ethics (CJR.org)

(Oct. 27, 2011) The young Iranian prisoner was no more than fourteen, still caked with a thick layer of dust from the battlefield. He was among thousands of old men and young boys being held in an Iraqi POW camp somewhere outside Basrah. It was September 1980, the early weeks of the Iran-Iraq War, and […]

The Mission of Indonesian Journalism: Balancing Democracy, Development, and Islamic Values (Int’l Journal of Press/Politics)

Vol. 16 No. 2 April 2011 — Indonesia, the world’s third largest democracy, has been called a template for Muslim political reform and has the potential to serve as a bridge between the United States and the Islamic world. Indonesian journalists play a vital role. Since the  collapse of the Suharto regime in the late […]

The Mission of Arab Journalism: Creating Change in a Time of Turmoil (Int’l Journal of Press/Politics)

(Vol. 13 No. 3 July 2008) In the years after 9/11, the Bush administration repeatedly charged that the Arab media are biased against the United States. A cross-border survey of 601 Arab journalists found that much of the conventional wisdom that has shaped U.S. public diplomacy  policy toward the region lacks substance.Arab journalists see their mission […]

Western, Arab Journalists Miles Apart in Cartoon Rift (CJR.org)

DOHA, QATAR (Feb. 3, 2006) – It is a row that gives new meaning to the phrase, “publish and be damned.” The convulsion of outrage across the Muslim world over the publication of editorial cartoons deemed blasphemous to the Prophet Muhammad is another reminder of the essential disconnect in perceptions that continues to drive the rift […]