Inside the Indonesian Newsroom: The Good, the Bad and the Hopeful (CJR.Org)

(May 3, 2013) — Indonesia remains a nation in flux. So, too, its journalism. Fifteen years after the country’s long-time strongman and president, Suharto, was overthrown and press restrictions were eased, Indonesian journalists continue to face a host of pressures: The pay is still lousy, the challenges still complex, the physical dangers still real. But […]

The Mission of Indonesian Journalism: Balancing Democracy, Development, and Islamic Values (Int’l Journal of Press/Politics)

Vol. 16 No. 2 April 2011 — Indonesia, the world’s third largest democracy, has been called a template for Muslim political reform and has the potential to serve as a bridge between the United States and the Islamic world. Indonesian journalists play a vital role. Since the  collapse of the Suharto regime in the late […]

Inside the Arab Newsroom: Arab Journalists Evaluate Themselves and the Competition (Journalism Studies)

(Vol. 10 No. 2 April 2009) In the years since 9/11, much has been written about the alleged bias and lack of professionalism in the Arab media. The first cross-border survey of Arab journalists finds that they have a mixed view of their own industry. They are frank about the lack of independence, fairness and […]