How Bob Simon, Brian Williams Present a Parable of the Digital Age (PBS MediaShift)

(Feb. 13, 2015) It’s not about you; it’s about the story. That’s what we tell TV journalism students. The tragic death of 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon reminds us that even in the video selfie culture of TV news, accurate reporting matters. Bob’s death after a lifetime of covering conflict comes against the backdrop of […]

J-School Survival Tools (Chronicle of Higher Education)

(Nov. 11, 2013) I recently learned that the publisher of a rural daily newspaper in Washington State, an alumnus of our university, was angry at me. I believe, he’d told a colleague, that print is dead. I was perplexed. Then I recalled that he had visited our college a few years ago, when we were […]

Pakistani Journalism (Media, Culture and Society, Vol. 35, No. 5)

Lawrence Pintak and Syed Javed Nazir (July 2013) FOR FULL ARTICLE WITH CHARTS, VISIT SAGE JOURNAL JOURNALISM A loosening of controls on the Pakistani media in recent years has meant the influence of Pakistani journalists is increasingly being felt in country’s tumultuous internal politics and its relations with the West. That has sparked a backlash, […]

Islam, Identity and Professional Values (Journalism, Online First)

(June 2013) Islam is a religion, but it is also a philosophy. An analysis of surveys in the Arab world, Indonesia and Pakistan reveals that the mission and values of journalists in those Muslim-majority regions closely track Islamic obligations to tell the truth, seek justice and work toward the public interest. This article provides empirical […]

Inside the Indonesian Newsroom: The Good, the Bad and the Hopeful (CJR.Org)

(May 3, 2013) — Indonesia remains a nation in flux. So, too, its journalism. Fifteen years after the country’s long-time strongman and president, Suharto, was overthrown and press restrictions were eased, Indonesian journalists continue to face a host of pressures: The pay is still lousy, the challenges still complex, the physical dangers still real. But […]

Journalistic Firebombs in the Middle East: Is it our job to inflame or inform? (CJR.org)

(Sept. 27, 2012) The pen is mightier than the sword, but it is also far more lethal when manipulated irresponsibly. Consider Charb. There is a ridiculous photo circulating on the web showing the editor of Charlie Hebdo (Charlie Weekly), the French satirical magazine. He goes by the name Charb, and in one hand he holds […]

Washington State’s Rural Information Ghettos (The Seattle Times)

(June 18, 2012) In huge sections of Washington, citizens have little or no access to news about what is taking place in their own communities. The situation is particularly grim in areas populated by minorities and on some of the vast Native American reservations. By Lawrence Pintak Special to The Times THE city manager was […]

Report on Media and Policy in the Muslim World Retreat

(Feb. 10, 2012) Journalists across the Muslim world are in need of political and practical support in the face of a backlash from governments struggling to undermine the media revolution sweeping the Middle East, Southeast and South Asia, according to a new report released by The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State […]

POWs, Dead Dictators, and Journalistic Ethics (CJR.org)

(Oct. 27, 2011) The young Iranian prisoner was no more than fourteen, still caked with a thick layer of dust from the battlefield. He was among thousands of old men and young boys being held in an Iraqi POW camp somewhere outside Basrah. It was September 1980, the early weeks of the Iran-Iraq War, and […]

Inside Pakistani Journalism (The New York Times)

(Feb. 12, 2011) The Pakistani public, long skeptical of American goals in Afghanistanand the Muslim world, is now outraged over Washington’s insistence that the authorities release a former United States Special Forces soldier charged with killing two Pakistani men last month. In this instance, as always,Pakistan’s tumultuous news media is the prism through whichUnited States […]