Boycotting Al Jazeera (PostGlobal)

CAIRO, Egypt (March 26, 2008) – It appears that Israel is taking a page from the George W. Bush book of public diplomacy: attempting to influence coverage by Arab media by boycotting the most influential television station in the Arab world. In the latest news from Jerusalem, it seems the Ehud Olmert government has decided […]

Satellite TV News and Arab Democracy (Journalism Practice)

Vol. 2 No. 1 Feb. 2008 — The red and white banners of Lebanon’s anti-Syrian protests in the spring of 2005 were a testament to the transformational power of the Arab media revolution. Without al-Jazeera and the new constellation of Arab satellite broadcasters, it is unlikely there would ever have been a “Cedar Revolution,” as […]

Al-Jazeera English: Day One Report Card (Der Speigel)

 Published on Thursday, November 16, 2006 by Der Speigel Call it the Un-CNN. Imagine that the BBC devotes 24 hours to special coverage of Africa and the Middle East and you will get a sense of the first day of broadcasting for al-Jazeera English (AJE), the English-language cousin of the channel the Bush administration loves […]

Al-Jazeera International, Not Quite Ready for Takeoff (CJR.org)

CAIRO (April 27, 2006) – Those new monitors they’re installing in Washington briefing rooms will remain dark for a little while longer: Al-Jazeera International (AJI), the English-language cousin to the Bush administration’s Qatar-based nemesis, has once more delayed its launch plans. The channel was originally expected to go live early this year. Then late winter. […]

Western, Arab Journalists Miles Apart in Cartoon Rift (CJR.org)

DOHA, QATAR (Feb. 3, 2006) – It is a row that gives new meaning to the phrase, “publish and be damned.” The convulsion of outrage across the Muslim world over the publication of editorial cartoons deemed blasphemous to the Prophet Muhammad is another reminder of the essential disconnect in perceptions that continues to drive the rift […]

Arab Media in the Vortex (Journal of Transnational Broadcasting Studies)

(Winter 2005) “Anyone who tells you they are not scared silly is lying,” retired Annahar publisher Ghassan Tueni, the living symbol of Lebanese media independence, said in mid-autumn as we sat in his office overlooking Beirut’s port and newly reborn downtown. “We built this glass tower as a symbol of the new Lebanon. Now it […]